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Merry Freakin' Christmas!

The best way to spread Christmas Cheer, is singing loud for all to hear. -Buddy the Elf


I love Christmas time.  I love the decorations, the lights, the songs, the wrapping paper, the corny movies, the gift exchanges, the cookies, the Santa visits, the angel trees, the ornaments, the stories of the "first" Christmas, the little sheepies in the nativity sets that join their masters in admiring a baby, and really, all the traditions.

I have, and still do, at times, let myself get lost in the busyness and stress that this holiday season can bring.  But this year, when trying to come up with a song lyric to draw and frame for my living room, and getting a hilariously unhelpful suggestion from my husband, I began to reflect on what I was going to let Christmas mean to me this year.  It can mean so many different things, as many different things as there are different relationships with the Divine and/or with Jesus.  Is it about giving or charity or hope or joy or toys or family or calm or light or peace?  Yes.  And more.  

But this year, I am choosing an intention for my advent season, and for me, it is going to be peace.  I am going to focus my attention on being a peaceful person, especially in my home and toward my family, and encouraging peacefulness among us.  I won't ignore the joy, I never can, but will take time and responsibility to set the tone, and lead with love.

What will you focus on this holiday season?  What is your favorite part about Christmas?  Do you have a favorite Christmas song lyric?

"Peace on Earth will come to all, if we just follow the Light." 
Here Comes Santa Claus

Here are some of the song lyrics I ended up doodling:

One daughter's lyric suggestion, from "Jingle Bells."
The other daughter's suggestion, also from "Jingle Bells."
My idea, from "O Holy Night."
My so-helpful husband's lyric submission, from "Good King Wenceslas."

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